Alison Pill pictured above
Freelance writer Andrew Fish interviews actors, musicians, directors, writers, and artists
in the creative community of Los Angeles and across the globe

Articles reprinted with permission of Venice Magazine.
Email the writer: andrewvenice |at| andrew-fish.com
 


Paul Giamatti
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, November-December 2010

Paul Giamatti
A Man of the People

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Amiable everyman Paul Giamatti discusses his films in detail, and shares his thoughts on making a drunken lout lovable in Barney's Version.


Introduction:

Among the ranks of Hollywood's leading men, Paul Giamatti stands alone. Unassuming at first glance, he infuses his characters with an unguarded intensity and strangely comforting charisma that bring out the beauty in discontent and the extraordinary in the everyday. His uncommonly sincere performances leave you sympathizing with antagonists, forgiving offensive behavior, and feeling warm and fuzzy for bitter, disheveled curmudgeons. Giamatti is a star for the rest of us, a dose of gritty and often hilarious reality, whom audiences identify with for his ability to illuminate, with a devilish smirk, the predicaments and possibilities of the common man. His latest project is the upcoming Barney's Version, based on Mordecai Richler's 1997 novel, about a self-destructive hopeless romantic who plows through everything in his path to find love and has little idea what to do when he gets it....
Read the full article here
 


Anna Paquin
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, Summer 2010

It's in Her Blood
From Child Prodigy to Supernatural Heroine, Anna Paquin Has Us Under Her Spell

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Anna Paquin on Sookie Stackhouse, her Oscar win at age 11, and living the life she'd only imagined

Introduction:
Anna Paquin is a true natural. At the age of nine she went to an open casting call near her home in New Zealand for an independent film called The Piano, and at 11 she won the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for a performance that no one saw coming. She was, quite simply, astonishing as Flora McGrath, who traveled with her mother (Holly Hunter) to the home of her new stepfather (Sam Neill) in the forests of New Zealand's South Island. The depth and command she brought to her character in Jane Campion's 1993 masterwork were rare for an actor of any age, much less a child, so it should come as no surprise that, 16 years later, Paquin is still keeping audiences under her spell...
Read the full article here
 


Woody Harrelson
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, November 2009

Woody Harrelson
The One and Only

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
From "Cheers" to The Messenger, Woody Harrelson reflects on his sitcom days, his big-screen hits, and his pro-soldier, anti-war philosophy.

Introduction:
From sitcom stardom to big-screen blockbusters, Woody Harrelson can’t be pinned down. He’s played a naive bartender, a basketball hustler, an unconscionable killer, and a porn tycoon, and has made it all flow. Harrelson’s range was scarcely predicted when he showed up to replace Coach on NBC’s “Cheers” back in 1985. His character, who by sheer coincidence was also named Woody, was childlike, sentimental, a little slow on the uptake, and instantly embraced by audiences upon his arrival in season four...
Read the full article here
 
 


John Goodman
Venice Magazine, April 2010

Everybody Loves John Goodman

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
The legendary John Goodman talks New Orleans, Jack Kevorkian, "Roseanne," and his adventures with the Coen brothers.

Introduction:
John Goodman is a fixture in contemporary American cinema and television. Beloved for his roughedged tenderness on “Roseanne” and idolized for his tyrannical loyalty in The Big Lebowski, he has a knack for cultivating hilarity in the darkest places and jubilance in righteous anger. He’s a master of the jovial veneer that thinly veils a percolating menace, and simply unrivaled at flying off the handle. Goodman’s body of work is prolific to the point of common knowledge, as one would be hard pressed to find someone unfamiliar with him, and equally challenged to locate a moviegoer who isn’t a fan...
Read the full article here
 

Russell Brand | Venice | Andrew Fish
Russell Brand
Venice Magazine, April 2008

Russell's Brand New Bag
Incorrigible Anti-Hero on the Verge of Stateside Stardom

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
British comic Russell Brand reflects on the joys of the Sarah Marshall set, and the perilous hijinks of his troubled past.

Introduction:
If he has any need for privacy, Russell Brand should enjoy his stateside obscurity while it lasts. With his gleefully smoldering performance as the libidinous rock-star rebound beau of the title character in Forgetting Sarah Marshall, Brand's wicked intelligence, brutal honesty, and chiseled good looks are on the brink of attracting the kind of rabid following over here that he currently experiences in the U.K...
Read the full article here
 

Malcolm McDowell | Andrew Fish | Venice Magazine
Malcolm McDowell
Venice Magazine, September-October 2011

Malcolm McDowell
The Icon in the Flesh

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
With his blue-eyed gaze and air of perpetual amusement, Malcolm McDowell has been captivating audiences for over four decades. His charisma and intensity strike a cultural nerve, tickling the imagination of everyone suspicious of the status quo. The actor's first subversive triumph came in 1968 with his role as a percolating revolutionary at a boarding school in Lindsay Anderson's If.... Ending his character's scholastic career with gunfire and a grin, the young star caught the attention of Stanley Kubrick, who cast him in A Clockwork Orange. McDowell's portrayal of the sociopathic Alex in the 1971 classic was an incendiary moment in film history. Opinion of the film was so split that it was nominated for four Academy Awards and banned in Britain for 27 years...
Read the full article here
 
 

Diane Lane | Venice Magazine | Andrew Fish
Diane Lane
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, March-April 2011

Diane Lane Hits Her Stride
With grace, guts, and poise, the screen veteran triumphs in HBO's "Cinema Verite"

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
From child actor to veteran movie star, Diane Lane is at the top of her game.

Introduction:
Diane Lane's rise to household name has been decades in the making. She toured internationally with the famed La MaMa theater company as a child, and at 13 she starred in A Little Romance alongside Laurence Olivier, which landed her on the cover of Time Magazine in 1979. She appeared in Francis Ford Coppola's The Outsiders and Rumble Fish, both in 1983, and on TV's Western epic, "Lonesome Dove," in 1989, which earned her an Emmy nod. Her Oscar nomination for her dark and sultry performance in 2002's Unfaithful, which placed her front and center, was a pinnacle reached through her slow and steady burn that's now propelling her into the realm of matriarch...
Read the full article here
 


Stephen Moyer
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, July-August 2009

Interview With the Vampire
True Blood's Stephen Moyer


By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Stephen Moyer on his beginnings, his theater days, and his role of the vampire Bill Compton on HBO's "True Blood."

Introduction:
The vampires, shape-shifters, and supernatural storms of hedonism are causing quite a ruckus. In this strange reality where blood-drinking creatures live among humans with a supposed promise of civility, how can everyone live in peace? "True Blood," the hit HBO series created by "Six Feet Under" mastermind Alan Ball, that's now in its second season, explores humanity's irreconcilable differences, and how we manage to move forward without completely destroying each other...
Read the full article here
 

Melissa Leo | Venice Magazine | Andrew Fish
Melissa Leo
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, January-February 2011

Melissa Leo Takes on The Fighter

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Far sweeter and softer than many of the characters she plays, Melissa Leo opens up about her work on The Fighter and her love of make-believe.

Introduction: Knowing Melissa Leo as the fiercely devoted matriarch of The Fighter, a champion of human rights on HBO's "Treme," a sacrificial mother in Frozen River, and a dirty cop in last year's Conviction, it leaves one wide-eyed when meeting her in person. The intense, singleminded vibe of her on-screen roles gives way to an easy, warm thoughtfulness and gently flowing conversation. Winner of this year's Best Supporting Actress Golden Globe for her role as Alice Ward in The Fighter, and nominee for the Best Actress Academy Award for 2008's Frozen River, Leo is a strikingly free spirit, which is likely what makes her so open to the compelling characters she plays...
Read the full article here
 
 

Terry Gilliam | Andrew Fish | Venice Magazine
Terry Gilliam
Venice Magazine
December 2009 / January 2010

Terry Gilliam
The Road to Parnassus

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Master of the whimsically surreal, director Terry Gilliam takes us through his early years, then full-circle to his current stream-of-consciousness exploration, The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus.

Introduction:
A bored, middle-aged man stares vacantly at his television, as a little sun on the end of a stick extends from the screen and pokes him on the nose. His eyes go blank and he melts into his chair, as his bodily essence pours out the cuffs of his pants and streams into a grating on the floor, dripping into a sculpture mold that, one by one, churns out millions of identical families — naked but for their socks, glasses, and Mickey Mouse ears — who populate the world with mindless compliance. Director Terry Gilliam’s animated intro sequence to Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life represents all that he lives to joyously dismantle...
Read the full article here
 

Kevin Smith & Jason Mewes | Andrew Fish | Venice Magazine
Kevin Smith &
Jason Mewes
Venice Magazine, September-October 2011

Kevin Smith & Jason Mewes
How Jay & Silent Bob conquered the Internet and paved the way to Red State

By Andrew Fish


Introduction:
First sighted loitering outside the Quick Stop in Leonardo, New Jersey, Jay and Silent Bob have been getting into mischief for 17 years and counting. They started off as lovable public nuisances in Clerks (1994), then as game-show saboteurs in Mallrats (1995), relationship gurus in Chasing Amy (1997), unlikely prophets in Dogma (1999), fugitive comic-book stars in Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (2001), and full circle to neighborhood delinquents in Clerks II (2006). At the helm of the View Askew productions was Kevin Smith, a.k.a. Silent Bob, who created the characters as a tribute to the singular personality of his buddy, Jason Mewes, the ever-chattering, expletive-loving Jay...
Read the full article here
 

David Cronenberg | Andrew Fish | Venice Magazine
David Cronenberg
Venice Magazine, September 2008

Adaptation, Evolution, and the Intimacy of Violence
David Cronenberg resurrects The Fly with full orchestra

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
David Cronenberg, director of Videodrome, The Fly, Existenz, Naked Lunch and other reality-busting films, discusses technologies like the iPhone, which serve to further meld humans and technology.

Introduction:
A typewriter once became so sexually stimulated, that it turned into a bug resembling a human torso, which slithered around with pelvic thrusts before being chased off a balcony with a riding crop. A dream, a delusion, a scene from Naked Lunch...
Read the full article here
 
 


Katey Sagal
Venice Magazine, October 2008

Katey Sagal's Jagged New Guise
She's been married with children, gone intergalactic, and now it's time to be bad — "Anarchy"-style

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Katey Sagal played Peg Bundy on "Married with Children" and the voice of Leela on "Futurama." Now she's crackin' skulls on FX's "Sons of Anarchy."

Introduction:
"Do you wanna touch me, sweetheart?" she growls. "Would that make you happy?" Gemma is letting someone know exactly who's in charge, and who isn't invited to dinner. This is not the Katey Sagal we're used to, as she plays the hardened, driven matriarch of a Southern California motorcycle club...
Read the full article here
 


Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.
Venice Magazine, July-August 2011

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.
On the Ravages of Coal and the Fight for The Last Mountain

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Though few would associate toasting a slice of bread with blowing the tops off of the Appalachian Mountains, this kind of explosive coal mining plays a major role in providing the daily electricity needs of the United States. Director Bill Haney's new documentary, The Last Mountain, makes clear that roughly half of the electricity in the U.S. is derived from coal-fired power plants and that "mountaintop removal" — which has been practiced since the 1960s — has become a prevalent extraction method in Appalachia, where a third of our coal comes from. The film follows a group of activists as they fight to stop the blasting on West Virginia's Coal River Mountain, contending that coal and silica dust in the air, coal-derived contaminants in their well-water, and the mining waste that's poured into adjacent valleys are severely and sometimes fatally impacting the health and livelihoods of local residents...
Read the full article here
 


Serj Tankian
Venice Magazine, March 2010

The Manic Maestro's Epic Symphony

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Hard-rock icon Serj Tankian has a voice and esthetic that hit the music scene with a sound it had never heard before. He talks with us about his new orchestral project, Elect the Dead Symphony, his childhood in Beirut, his time with System of a Down, and his thoughts on the state of civilization.

Introduction:
With soft, soothing lilts rising to thundering, operatic crescendos before ripping into a blood-curdling roar, Serj Tankian’s vocals seem both at odds and in perfect sync with the brutal nature of hard rock and metal. The lead singer of System of a Down’s unorthodox approach to the genre gave us something we’d never heard before, and thrust the fans toward the brink of feral ecstasy. And now that Tankian has stepped away from the head-banging bedlam in favor of harp, cello, and viola, the audience that used to descend into the primal mosh now gazes wide-eyed at their luminary, and becomes a sea of great, big, goofy grins...
Read the full article here

 
             
 


Tony Shalhoub
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, July-August 2008

"Monk" hits 100, not that anyone's obsessively counting

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Tony Shalhoub talks to Venice shortly before the airing of the 100th episode of "Monk." Shalhoub discusses the enduring show, classic films films like Big Night, and his thoughts on mental illness.

Introduction:
"I try not to take as long with this as Monk would," Tony Shalhoub remarks quietly, as he shaves with meticulous care. We're in the trailer, a short distance from the Red Pearl restaurant on Melrose, where the crew busily prepares to shoot a scene for a season seven episode of the hit show, "Monk"...
Read the full article here
 


Hope Davis
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, May 2010

The Power of Hope Davis
Bringing Complexity and Realism to "The Special Relationship"

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Hope Davis on her prolific career, from The Daytrippers to About Schmidt to HBO's "The Special Relationship."

Introduction:
There’s something familiar about Hope Davis, like you’ve seen her before or she’s someone you knew a while back. Her everywoman quality coupled with a gift for subtlety and nuance allows her to inhabit a character in a way that always invites empathy. She makes every role accessible and welcomes you in. So when HBO ramped up for “The Special Relationship,” an inside look at the American-British alliance during the 1990s, Davis was the top pick for the part of Hillary Rodham Clinton...
Read the full article here
 


David Arquette
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, March 2010

The David Arquette Interview

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
David Arquette tells us of his 100-year family legacy in show business, and recalls poignant moments and wild times in his renowned and off-beat career.

Introduction:
The rise of David Arquette was inevitable, when viewed from a historical perspective. His great-grandparents were vaudeville duo Arquette and Clark. His grandfather was Cliff Arquette, who carved himself a niche as TV’s Charley Weaver, a “Jack Paar Show” regular. His father was Lewis Arquette, a journeyman actor and comedian, a recurring character on “The Waltons,” and a prolific day player, showing up on “Barney Miller,” “Fantasy Island,” “Simon and Simon,” “Remington Steele,” “Seinfeld,” and dozens of other popular television shows. A straight shot from the earliest days of American show business, through the dawn of television and the rat race of primetime, the youngest star in the Arquette dynasty was a long time coming.
Read the full article here
 
 

Lucy Lawless | Spartacus | Xena | Andrew Fish
Lucy Lawless
Venice Magazine, February 2010

Lucy Lawless
Beauty, Blood and Sand

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Lucy Lawless, who sizzles on Starz' "Spartacus: Blood and Sand," discusses her character's greed, envy, and avarice. The statuesque beauty also offers her thoughts on her iconic beginnings as "Xena: Warrior Princess."

Introduction:
Lucy Lawless is a very different kind of beautiful. Her power is front and center, with her broad smile and straight talk cutting to the chase and giving the distinct impression that she doesn’t suffer fools. The sultry star has earned a singular place in the public eye as an image of strength, whose characters focus a piercing fire toward such ends as kindness, justice, and vicious retribution....
Read the full article here
 


Kevin Nealon
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, June 2009

The Kevin Nealon Experience
From nine years on "SNL" to sleazing it up on "Weeds," the irreverent cut-up delights in the absurd

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Comedy veteran Kevin Nealon takes us from his appearance on "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson, to his years on "Saturday Night Live," to reveling in immorality on "Weeds."

Introduction:
We meet up with Kevin Nealon on the "Weeds" set and within minutes we're looking for the pot store. He leads us past the extras to the food truck, where he gets us ice cream sandwiches before he starts asking around. We stop in the master bedroom, where Mary-Louise Parker's Nancy Botwin likes to lay her head after a long day of cheating death and peddling grass...
Read the full article here
 


Ziggy Marley
Venice Magazine, May 2009

Ziggy Marley's Family Time

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Ziggy Marley on his choice to produce his first children's album, Family Time, and the role his new family has played in the evolution of his music.

Introduction:
There's a tricycle in the front yard, a little dress next to a pair of sneakers in the foyer, and framed photos of happy occasions oozing with love as you enter the Marley residence. With a wife and two young children, Ziggy Marley has turned his full attention toward family -- at home, and in the studio. The Grammy-winning reggae singer-songwriter's latest release is a playful album called Family Time...
Read the full article here
 
 


Alex Gibney
Venice Magazine, November-December 2010

Once the Sheriff of Wall Street
Alex Gibney's Client 9: The Rise and Fall of Eliot Spitzer

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Determining that Congress and the Securities and Exchange Commission were doing little to stifle the rampant inequities in investment banking, mutual funds, insurance, and mortgage lending, Eliot Spitzer took it upon himself to crack the whip on Wall Street. With the hub of American finance under his jurisdiction, he redefined the role of New York State Attorney General and faced off with corporate giants like Bank of America, Merrill Lynch, and AIG. Through his 1998-2006 tenure, Spitzer was hailed as New York's white knight and vilified as an overreaching bully. "Honk if You've Been Threatened by Eliot Spitzer" was spotted on bumper stickers as the Bronx-raised Harvard Law graduate tore into the problems that now take center stage in the wake of the financial meltdown...
Read the full article here
 

Michael Haneke | Andrew Fish | Venice Magazine
Michael Haneke
Venice Magazine
December 2009 / January 2010

Michael Haneke
The Horror of Ideology

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Michael Haneke — infamous director of such disturbing, question-riddled films as Funny Games, The Piano Teacher, and Cache — explains how ideology and the repression of spirit are at the root of fascism in The White Ribbon.

Introduction:
You never forget a film by Michael Haneke. Once seen, its images, crimes, and violations remain lodged in memory, their disturbing nature bringing into question concepts one normally chooses to avoid entirely. Implicating the malaise of modern society, and people’s unwillingness to be honest with themselves, the equally revered and vilified Austrian filmmaker has explored the tendency of secrets and repressed emotion to result in catastrophe. Expect no satisfaction from a Haneke film, as disquieting questions are raised, never answered, and left to wander in one’s mind in perpetuity...
Read the full article here
 


Charles Ferguson
Venice Magazine,September-October 2010

A Guided Tour of the Financial Collapse
Director Charles Ferguson's Inside Job delivers a step-by-step look at the global economic crisis

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Investment giant Lehman Brothers went bankrupt on September 15, 2008, and the federal government began its bailout of the world's largest insurance conglomerate, AIG, a day later. Cut to 2010 and record numbers of Americans have lost their homes and our unemployment rate now flirts with 10% in the aftermath of an economic meltdown. Millions of investors had poured trillions of dollars into mortgage-backed securities — within bundles called CDOs — and then witnessed an unparalleled number of homeowners fall behind in their payments. Years of subprime home mortgages going to those who ultimately couldn't afford them, coupled with a longtime trend of predatory lending, had come to a head. As the value of these bundled securities dropped steeply in parallel with the delinquent mortgages, both the investors and the former homeowners were left in the dust...
Read the full article here
 
 


Taraji P. Henson | Venice Magazine | Andrew Fish

Taraji P. Henson
Venice Magazine
December 2008 / January 2009

Great Things Coming for Taraji P. Henson

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Taraji P. Henson explores her maternal role in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, her hardcore turn in Smokin' Aces, and balancing stardom and motherhood.

Introduction:
Pushing a cart through the produce aisle with his mom, Marcell checks his watch. "Mom! It's 4:38!" he shouts. "Hurry up! You gotta call, you gotta call!" Taraji P. Henson looks up with a start, realizing she's late for her phone interview. Henson is pulling double duty as she navigates through her responsibilities as an actress promoting three major releases, while providing love and stability for her family...
Read the full article here
 


Loudon Wainwright III by Andrew Fish

Loudon Wainwright III
Venice Magazine
July  / August 2008

Loudon Wainwright III Recovers the Folk Exploits of a Young Man

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Loudon Wainwright III talks about his latest album, Recovery, a collection of his classic songs, revisited with a full band. Wainwright tells Venice of his beginnings and of his journey thus far -- "Dead Skunk" and all.

Introduction:
As a car pulls up to the studio, the trilby hat is a dead giveaway as to who's behind the wheel. His trademark solo entrance and subsequent cheery vibe, tinted with the sardonic, makes loudon Wainwright III an easy legend to be around...
Read the full article here
 


Eamonn Walker | Andrew Fish | Venice Magazine

Eamonn Walker
Venice Magazine, March 2009

Eamonn Walker on his Discourse with God, and the Alchemy of Character

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Eamonn Walker discusses his role on NBC's modern-day Bible story, "Kings," and clues us in on his character techniques, and his spiritual path.

Introduction:
Not long after being warned that he was losing favor with God, King Silas' truce with the enemy nation of Gath now teeters on collapse. Should he employ David in the delicate affairs of state that lie ahead? Or is the impulsive young upstart -- who won the hearts of all Gilboa with his defeat of the dreaded Goliath -- a threat to the King's very throne?...
Read the full article here
 
 

Jerry Weintraub | Venice Magazine | Andrew Fish
Jerry Weintraub
Venice Magazine, March-April 2011

Jerry Weintraub
Changing the Face of Hollywood — His Way

By Andrew Fish


Introduction:
"Ican fix anything. I'm really good at it," Jerry Weintraub grins. "My phonebook, the people that I can reach out to, is a who's who of the world. I reach presidents and ambassadors and kings and queens. I can reach anybody I want to reach. So when you have that kind of juice and you use it properly, you can fix anything that goes wrong." Meet the kid from the Bronx who wasn't in the William Morris mailroom three months before landing a junior agent position at MCA, and ended up reinventing the live concert industry by winning over Elvis Presley's cigar-chomping manager with a grab bag of persistence, personality, and a million-dollar wire transfer...
Read the full article here
 


Sam Trammell
Venice Magazine,Summer 2010

More Than Meets the Eye
Shape Shifting Sam Trammell Is Full of Surprises

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Sam Trammell on "True Blood," his climb to the top, and his exploits in academia.

Introduction:
The down-home, all-American guy that everyone thinks they've come to know has a complexity beneath the surface that few would expect. Sam Trammell and his alter-ego, "True Blood"'s Sam Merlotte, have a lot in common in this regard. Merlotte manages to keep a low profile as the owner of the neighborhood saloon in the fictional Louisiana town of Bon Temps, closely guarding his true nature as a shape-shifter, a creature capable of transforming into any animal he sees. Trammell is a talented, charismatic television actor on a hit show, who surfs and plays guitar — and is also a classical pianist who graduated from Brown University with a degree in semiotics and spent a year in Paris studying French philosophy. "Strictly speaking, it's the study of signification," he explains of semiotics during our meeting at a West Hollywood cafe...
Read the full article here
 

John Mahoney | Venice | Andrew Fish
John Mahoney
Venice Magazine, May 2009

Late Bloomer
Currently on the Geffen boards and HBO's couch, the beloved John Mahoney commands our rapt attention

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Veteran television, stage, and screen actor John Mahoney tells of his childhood in Manchester, his years on "Frasier," his role onstage in "The Seafarer," and his time with Gabriel Byrne on HBO's "In Treatment"

Introduction:
John Mahoney was born in war-torn England. He served in the U.S. Army, taught English while studying for a master's degree, and edited a medical journal before he began acting at age 37. And it was more than 15 years later that the affable, silver-haired late-bloomer became a beloved fixture of prime time as Martin Crane, the curmudgeonly dad on the hit television show, "Frasier"...
Read the full article here
 
 

Alison Pill | Venice | Andrew Fish
Alison Pill
Venice Magazine
December 2008 / January 2009

Alison Pill Busts Into the Boys' Room

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Alison Pill on her role in Gus Van Sant's Milk, starring Sean Penn. From Broadway to an Oscar-nominated film, Pill's focus on craft over celebrity sets her apart from her apart from the pack.

Introduction:
Alison Pill isn't from around these parts. The New York City girl doesn't seem to covet the accolades and red carpets of Hollywood that most 23-year-old actresses look to as their guiding light -- and she steers clear of Los Angeles when she can. Her character, Anne Kronenberg, is the lone lesbian in politician Harvey Milk's boys-only capaign office, who comes aboard to kick their gay-rights campaign into high gear...
Read the full article here
 

Robert Crais | Andrew Fish | Venice Magazine
Robert Crais
Venice Magazine, January-February 2011

Zen and the Art of the Crime Novel

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Overflowing with transplants reinventing their lives in pursuit of wealth and grandeur, Los Angeles is home to both the rich and powerful and the desperate and broken. In a larger-than-life town where far more dreams are shattered than realized, its dark cor ners are fertile ground for a strange and epic criminal underworld. For over 20 years, detective novelist Robert Crais has explored the shadows of our fair city through the adventures of private-eye Elvis Cole and his partner, Joe Pike. With his loud Hawaiian shirts, '66 yellow Corvette Stingray convertible, and an endless supply of smartass comments, former Army Ranger and Vietnam veteran Cole happily describes himself as the World's Greatest Detective...
Read the full article here
 

Kelli Giddish | Andrew Fish | Venice Magazine
Kelli Giddish
Venice Magazine, September-October 2010

It's All About the "Chase"
Kelli Giddish Is Having a Blast Pursuing Bad Guys

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Texas prisons are about to fill up with a mess of hardened criminals who've had their butts righteously kicked by a relentless blonde in cowboy boots. U.S. Marshal Annie Frost on NBC's new hot-pursuit drama, "Chase," tears after fugitives and nails them to the wall with keen analysis, brute force, and a touch of Southern-belle charm. The brains, brawn, beauty, and heart that bring this force of law and order to life is Georgia-born Kelli Giddish, a winsome, blue-eyed actor with an alluring smile and formidable drive...
Read the full article here
 
 

Rachele Lefevre | Andrew Fish | Venice Magazine
Rachelle Lefevre
Venice Magazine, January-February 2011

Rachelle Lefevre Is Off the Charts

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Rachelle Lefevre is on screen for all the right reasons. Whether digging into the core and consequence of human trauma, honoring her ancestors, or tearing through the jungle with a machete and a med kit, the flaming-haired heavy hitter mines the medium for all it's worth. As the seductive, damaged, malicious first wife of Paul Giamatti's Barney Panofsky in Barney's Version (2010), Lefevre channeled a perverse spitefulness as she emotionally gutted her costar. She called the Feds on Kevin Spacey's Jack Abramoff as a scorned girlfriend in Casino Jack (2010), and sang in Yiddish in Fugitive Pieces (2007)...
Read the full article here
 


Chris Weitz
Venice Magazine, July-August, 2011

Chris Weitz
From the helm of American Pie, About a Boy,  and  Twilight: New Moon, the filmmaker turns to the story of a father, son, and LA's undocumented society

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Few top-shelf directors have a resume as eclectic as that of Chris Weitz. He and his older brother, Paul, wrote the screenplay to the 1998 feature, Antz, starring the voice of Woody Allen, at the dawn of computer-animated films. The project's success led to their helming of American Pie, the 1999 teen sex comedy that became a cultural touchstone. This led to their work on the Chris Rock-starring Down to Earth in 2001, and then to writing and directing About a Boy, featuring Hugh Grant and Rachel Weisz, the following year, which earned the brothers an Oscar nomination for best adapted screenplay. Amid their directing and producing, Weitz co-starred in Chuck and Buck (2000), a bizarrely honest portrayal of sexuality and arrested development, which became a cult classic...
Read the full article here

 


Greg Gorman
Cover Story
Venice Magazine, September-October 2010

Seeing the Light
The Art of Greg Gorman

By Andrew Fish


Introduction:
"I think it's a strong relationship between highlights and shadows," responds Greg Gorman when asked to describe his style. "And it's not about what you reveal in the highlights, but it's what you keep from people in the shadows that tends to make pictures, for me, more interesting. I think a picture is most successful if it leaves you wanting to know more about a person rather than less." Gorman's mastery of both technique and communication has earned him a portfolio that includes Marlon Brando, Robert De Niro, Bette Davis, Al Pacino, Johnny Depp, Leonardo Di Caprio, Dustin Hoffman, Barbra Streisand, Jessica Lange, David Bowie, Sophia Loren, Andy Warhol, Billy Idol, and scores of others...
Read the full article here
 
             
             
 


Alison Pill
Venice Magazine, Summer 2010

Beyond Her Years
Alison Pill Wields Her Searing
Intensity in Starz's "The
Pillars of the Earth"


By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Alison Pill reflects on her volatile monarch in Starz's "The Pillars of the Earth," and her insular ex-convict — opposite Edie Falco — in the off-Broadway production of "This Wide Night."

Introduction:
The crown is under contention in mid-12th century England, a time known as The Anarchy. King Stephen is in power but the forces of Empress Maud are closing in ... When Starz set out to cast the role of the lionhearted queen for their epic, 8-hour miniseries, "The Pillars of the Earth" — based on the novel by Ken Follett about the battle-ridden construction of a cathedral in a small market town — the network was tasked with finding a young actor skilled and seasoned beyond her years...
Read the full article here
 

Susie Essman | Venice | Andrew Fish
Susie Essman
Venice Magazine
December 2009 / January 2010

Susie Essman
"Get Outta My House, Larry!"

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Standup comic Susie Essman dishes on her new book, and her sheer delight in telling Larry David where to stick it on HBO's long-running hit, "Curb Your Enthusiasm."

Introduction:
A fter working thousands of gigs, night after night for thelast 20 years, comic Susie Essman has earned the right to her cathartic kicking of Larry David the hell out of her house on HBO’s long-running mega-hit, “Curb Your Enthusiasm.” Essman is a poster girl for the requirement of tenacity in the world of standup comedy, where it can take decades to make it big. At 54, the brash, snarky, and charming comedienne has caught her wave, and is riding high on a show that’s approaching the realm of television institution. As Susie Greene, the tackily dressed wife of Jeff Garlin’s character, Jeff Greene, Essman has amassed a legion of followers...
Read the full article here
 


Emily Mortimer
Venice Magazine, May 2010

Emily Mortimer Is Ready for Anything
Harry Brown’s idealist detective proves, yet again, to be an actor without limits

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Emily Mortimer is always seeking a challenge. She chats with us about her no-nonsense detective in Harry Brown.

Introduction:
Emily Mortimer’s range is limitless as far as we can tell. Her current role as a by-the-book British police detective in the grittily austere, explosive, Michael Caine-starring Harry Brownis yet another case in point. Her grim gumshoe cuts no corners and nips levity in the bud as she takes on the gangland degradation of a London neighborhood and a retired Marine’s bloody pursuit of vigilante justice. This solemn portrayal of a cop’s determination to uphold the law amid obstruction from both criminals and colleagues alike is worlds away from her turns as a carefree young noblewoman in Kenneth Branagh’s 1930s-style Shakespearean musical, Love’s Labour’s Lost...
Read the full article here
 
             
 


Lonn Friend
Venice Magazine, July-August, 2011

Lonn Friend's Sweet Demotion
A writer's treck through the sacred and profane of rock & roll

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Lonn Friend flew high on journalistic success, found discontent and career descent as a corporate VP, and discovered a spiritual groove in the aftermath. "When my career was at its peak," the music writer recalls, "on any given week or month I would be traveling with a rock band. I had access to the pantheon of high-volume, multi-platinum noisemakers." As editor of RIP Magazine from 1987 to 1994, Friend chronicled the mayhem of the heavy-metal era. He gave Guns N' Roses their first cover story and documented the making of Metallica's Black Album, one of the top-selling records of all time. He flew on chartered jets with Kiss, Axl Rose, and Slash, had a spot called "Friend at Large" on MTV's "Headbanger's Ball," and hosted a nationally syndicated radio show called "Pirate Radio Saturday Night." With the fans as his priority, "I demanded exclusive photo shoots, which was unheard of for a metal magazine," he relates. "I wanted them to look like heroes and ran double-page openings to articles, so it was eye-popping. And this is a Beatles kid who's now green-lighting articles on Slayer and Carcass"...
Read the full article here
 


Patrick Takaya Solomon
Venice Magazine, September-October, 2011

Patrick Takaya Solomon Discovers the Hero Within

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Alice fell down the rabbit hole, Luke Skywalker met Obi-Wan Kenobi, and Harry Potter boarded the train. They faced challenges, met helpers, fought enemies, and grew into the heroes they were destined to be. Joseph Campbell found that cultures the world over have been telling the same story since the beginning of civilization. He called it "the hero's journey." The renowned scholar went on to suggest that this shared myth represents everyone's potential to change the way they live, find success and happiness, and share their rewards with others. "He realized that it was a blueprint for the way that a human life should be lived," explains Patrick Takaya Solomon, director of the new documentary, Finding Joe. "He found this pattern and realized that in the day-to-day living of it, it's about pursuing a goal, a passion, your bliss!"...
Read the full article here

 


Adina Porter
Venice Magazine, July-August, 2011

Adina Porter
Digging into the Dark Side of Motherhood

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
In a town where vampires profess peace and harmony with one side of their mouths and feed on people with the other, where werewolves ravage, and witches raise the dead, there's still room for a very human, very personal villain on HBO's "True Blood" — a manipulative, abusive mom. Lettie Mae Thornton was an alcoholic who was nothing but trouble for her daughter, Tara, whom she neglected as a child, until a bogus exorcism got her off the bottle and onto a sanctimonious pedestal under the guise of newfound faith. She went on to denigrate Tara's every move and ignore her suicide attempt in favor of putting the moves on the reverend who came over to help the girl in crisis. Adina Porter's portrayal of this damaged and damaging soul is packed with heavy-hitting malice, spiteful arrogance, denial, self-hatred, and the subtle maneuvering necessary to keep Tara in her life...
Read the full article here
 
 


Larysa Kondracki
Venice Magazine, July-August, 2011

One Woman's Fight Against the World of Human Trafficking
Larysa Kondracki's The Whistleblower

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
The Ukraine was in deep economic recession and postwar Bosnia in chaos as the selling of young girls from Kiev to brothels in Sarajevo became business as usual. When Nebraska police investigator, Kathryn Bolkovac, took a job as peacekeeper in Bosnia for a UN-contracted private military company in the late 1990s and learned that her colleagues were participating in the operation, she did what no one else was willing to do — her job. As a human rights investigator who was quickly promoted to head of the gender affairs unit, she uncovered and reported the crimes in progress to her superiors and was met with stonewalling and eventual dismissal. Yet with the help of Madeleine Rees, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights in Bosnia, Bolkovac gathered evidence and won a lawsuit for wrongful termination, which brought the company's involvement in human trafficking to light...
Read the full article here
 


Rally to Restore Sanity
Venice Magazine, November-December 2010

Rally to Restore Sanity
The Moderate Left Marches on Washington

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Two hundred thousand or so gather on the Washington Mall in support of sanity, civility, moderation, and/or fear. As "The Daily Show" and "The Colbert Report" are respective news and pundit-show sendups that have become as important as the programs they parody, so their lighthearted rally on October 30th turns out to be a powerful moment in our cultural and political history. With such unlikely clarion calls as respecting others with differing opinions and taking it down a notch, The Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear — initially billed as two competing events, Jon Stewart's Rally to Restore Sanity and Stephen Colbert's March to Keep Fear Alive — is a meeting place for fans with a shared passion for staying calm and designing witty protest signs...
Read the full article here
 


Malcolm Venville
Venice Magazine, Summer 2010

Feeling Lost? Rob a Bank.
Malcolm Venvile Does Henry's Crime


By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
A listless tollbooth operator sleepwalks his way through the nightshift, living a life so unexamined he doesn't even realize he's bored. At home, his wife wants a baby and he wants to eat his eggs and wander off to bed. There's a knock at the door and within hours, Henry, our drowsy protagonist played by Keanu Reeves, is tossed in the clink for robbing a bank, even though it was really Eddie (Fisher Stevens) who did it. Shortly after his release, the now-divorced Henry discovers his passion and reconnects with his former cellmate, Max — a good-hearted confidence man played by the legendary James Caan — and together they hatch a plan to rob the very bank that landed Henry in the slammer...
Read the full article here
 
 


Carolina Liar | Chad Wolf | Venice Magazine
Carolina Liar
Venice Magazine
July- August 2008

Carolina Liar's Unlikely Story

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
How did a kid from South Carolina end up helming a band alongside five Swedish Rockers? Carolina Liar's tale is told.

Introduction:
"I met this really cool cop family in Minnesota the other day. They're both cops, but on the side they have an embroidery business, and they're also rodeo clowns." If you sit down to chat with Carolina Liar's Chad Wolf, this is the kind of yarn he'll spin. His stories sound highly unlikely, but now that he's in the limelight, the chances of his grand tale turning out to be one big fib become smaller and smaller...
Read the full article here
 


Paramore | Venice | Andrew Fish
Paramore
Venice Magazine, September 2009

Paramore
Rockers in Their Prime

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
The young rockers are three albums in, and some of them are still in their teens.  Paramore has toured with No Doubt, and their Twilight video has been viewed by millions.  Lead singer Hayley Williams tells their story.

Introduction:
With their aggressive rock oozing confrontation, and vocals intent on exposing the nature of pain, longing, and hope, Paramore have vaulted from the club scene to major venues while some of their members are still in their teens.  Seasoned beyond their years, their mastery of the stage earned the young band a tour last summer with rock/ska legends No Doubt. Paramore's 20-year-old lead vocalist, Hayley Williams, with her shocking red hair and soulfully thundering voice, still seems awe-struck by the experience.  "It was unreal," she laughs.  "It wasn't real." Equally dreamlike for the hard-charging rockers is their high-profile contribution of their song, "Decode," to the wildly successful vampire tale, Twilight...
Read the full article here
 


MGMT | Venice | Andrew Fish
MGMT
Venice Magazine, October 2008

By hook or by spellbook, MGMT's Oracular Spectacular explodes in neon technicolor

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
MGMT spreads their message of peace, free love and digital adventure with few words, and an abundance of images from the past and the future.

Introduction:
Whether or not Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden of MGMT actually use magic to affect the world, the events of the past six months are exactly what would have happened if they did. From virtual obscurity came a dreamy, cathartic, almost absurdly catchy song about the inevitable downward spiral of the archetypal rock star -- and it hit big. "Time to Pretend," from the Brooklyn-based band's first LP, Oracular Spectacular, was picked up by KROQ, then Indie 103.1. With this energy infusion from L.A.'s dyad of milk-givers from which every undiscovered rock band longs to suckle, the "Time to Pretend" video -- a trippy, neo-hippie, wild digital hallucinatory collage portraying a tribe of ragamuffin youths left to fend for themselves on a post-apocalyptic beach...
Read the full article here
 
 



Roger Nygard
Venice Magazine, Summer 2010

Playfully Pondering the Infinite
Roger Nygard's The Nature of Existence

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Roger Nygard searches humanity for the answers to the ultimate questions.

Introduction:
It's a liberating experience sitting down with Roger Nygard to chat about his new documentary, The Nature of Existence. The possibilities for discussion are literally endless. The man who brought us Trekkies and Trekkies 2 spent four years traveling the world interviewing over 100 subjects, including guru Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, string theory physicist Leonard Susskind, science fiction author Orson Scott Card (Ender's Game), Roman Archbishop Domenico D'Ambrosio, outspoken atheist Richard Dawkins (The God Delusion), Ultimate Christian Wrestler Rob Adonis, director Irvin Kershner (The Empire Strikes Back), Stonehenge Druid King Arthur Pendragon, and scores of others who tackled Nygard's 85 questions, which included: "What is our purpose?" "Is there a God?" "Can religion and science coexist?" "Is masturbation a sin?"
Read the full article here

 


Bruce Spence | Venice | Andrew Fish
Bruce Spence
Venice Magazine, November 2009

Bruce Spence
On Myth and Legend

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
The lauded actor who's given life to Zeddicus Zu'l Zorander on "Legend of the Seeker," The Gyro Captain in Mad Max 2 and 3, and a host of other epic characters, discusses the nature of fantasy.

Introduction:
“Myth seems to follow me,” smiles the towering veteran actor. “Maybe I swallowed it. I don’t know.” We’ve traveled up the North Island of New Zealand to meet with Bruce Spence, who is fully garbed as the First Wizard of the Fourth Era, Zeddicus Zu’l Zorander, on the Auckland set of “Legend of the Seeker.” “This is a great irony,” he muses, “because I grew up in New Zealand, and I left here at about the age of 20. I never thought I’d find myself back in New Zealand, filming, let alone filming right across the road from the high school that I went to, where I never, ever dreamed of being an actor.”
Read the full article here
 


Brian Henson | Venice | Andrew Fish

Brian Henson
Venice Magazine, September 2008

Brian Henson and "Puppet Up! Uncensored" Declare Silliness a Sign of Maturity

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Brian Henson, heir to the throne at the Jim Henson Company, lets the puppets loose at a live, improvisational comedy show that ain't for kids.

Introduction:
Murderous fuzzy bunnies, foul-mouthed hot dogs jumping on a trampoline, an enormous stone idol receiving a colonic from his petit foam wife. Welcome to "Puppet-Up Uncensored"...
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Merle Dandridge
Venice Magazine, October 2009

Merle Dandridge Joins the Boys Club

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Merle Dandridge of "Spamalot," "Aida," "Rent," and other Broadway hits, discusses her childhood on an air command base, and the good fortune that brought her to the stage.

Introduction:
The reimagining of Monty Python and the Holy Grail as “Spamalot,” a Broadway musical, finally gives The Lady of the Lake the credit she’s due. It took over three decades, but the sentiment that “strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government,” now takes a back seat to her role as muse, wise counsel, and over-the-top diva. Merle Dandridge is both powerfully seductive and shamelessly goofy as the ethereal mistress who once held aloft Excalibur and declared Arthur king. The Lady, who first appears softly and dreamlike to convince a peasant named Dennis Galahad to join the Knights of the Round Table, soon reveals an ego and love of vocal gymnastics to rival any tabloid queen...
Read the full article here
 


Michael Stuhlbarg | Andrew Fish | Venice Magazine

Michael Stuhlbarg
Venice Magazine, October 2009

Michael Stuhlbarg
The Eyes and Angst of the Coen Brothers' A Serious Man

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
After years on stage, Broadway actor Michael Stuhlbarg's first major film role turns out to be the lead in the Coen Brothers' A Serious Man.

Introduction:
It’s not often you go to a press event and find the publicist practicing her Hebrew alphabet, and overhear a conversation about the length of the fast on Yom Kippur. The writers and photographers have gathered to cover Michael Stuhlbarg, star of the new Coen Brothers film, A Serious Man, a darkly droll exploration of the American-Jewish psyche. Offering a glimpse into the mindset of Hebrews of Eastern-European descent through the eyes and angst of Stuhlbarg’s Larry Gopnik, the movie’s dialogue is seasoned with words like mensch, macher, shul, and Hashem. Those who were primally tickled to see John Goodman’s furious “Shomer Shabbos!” outburst in The Big Lebowski, will now recognize that scene as a prelude to this quieter, question-steeped fable about a formerly content family man utterly bewildered by the crumbling of everything he’s held to be true...
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MGMT | Venice | Andrew Fish
Dustin Milligan
Venice Magazine, September 2009

Extract's Dustin Milligan Gets Judged

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Dustin Milligan is Mike Judge's newest protege, playing a would-be gigolo who's mind-numbingly slow on the uptake -- a striking contrast to the sharp-witted actor himself.

Introduction:
"Mike Judge is making another movie?" thought Dustin Milligan, as he settled into his new gig on "90210." "Awesome! And I get to read it? Even better! And I get to audition for Mike?" Milligan was stoked. Simply trying out for Extract, a movie helmed by the creator of "Beavis and Butt-Head," "King of the Hill," and Office Space, was a heck of a coup for a young actor looking to sink his teeth into some comedy. "I knew how important this audition would be if I could do it well.  When Mike and [Venice-based publicist] Mary Vernieu invited me in and I was able to read for them, it was a dream come true for me in the truest sense.  And then to make them laugh -- to make Mike Judge laugh -- which was happening a few seconds into the audition...
Read the full article here
 
 


Shemar Moore | Venice Magazine
Shemar Moore
Venice Magazine, September 2008

Profiling Shemar Moore
The "Criminal Minds" star reveals his broad view of the world

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Shemar Moore of crime drama "Criminal Minds" tells of his globe-trotting childhood and growing up as a bi-racial kid in a volatile era.

Introduction:
Civil rights were taking root, but equality was still a fight in 1970, the year Shemar Moore was born. With a mother who was white and a father who was black, Moore was an embodiment of the era. Even his name is a confluent idea: His father is Sherrod, his mother Marilyn, and he is a "harmony of the two," Moore explains. But life as a collective symbol of unity was far from comfortable for the family, spurring them to pull up stakes and move to Scandinavia...
Read the full article here
 


Morena Baccarin | Venice | Andrew Fish
Morena Baccarin
Venice Magazine, November 2009

Morena Baccarin
Reinventing "V"

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Morena Baccarin's Anna, leader of the reptilian Visitors, aims to end humanity with a quiet smile. The Brazil-born thespian tells of her roots in theater, her time on "Firefly," and the reimagining of "V."

Introduction:
We’ve breathed easy the past two decades, believing the red dust had finally wiped the Visitors from our planet for good. But the reptilians are back, along with the concept of a subtle, insidious alien invasion that provided chatter to our schooldays and nightmares after dark. “V” has returned to television, with Morena Baccarin’s Anna wielding her quiet beauty to lull the people of Earth into the notion that her species is here to guide us into a state of grace, to cure the sick and heal the planet. “We are of peace, always,” she intones. But her calm demeanor and captivating smile denote the end of humankind to those who know the truth. Baccarin was drawn to Anna as soon as she read the script. “This is a role that would be delicious to play,” she recalls thinking. And to bring truth to her performance, she chooses not to see Anna as a villain. “I don’t think I can if I want to play her well...”
Read the full article here
 


Billy Baldwin | Venice | Andrew Fish
William "Billy" Baldwin
Venice Magazine, October 2008

Growing Up Baldwin
William "Billy" Baldwin ponders his rowdy childhood, his politics, and "Dirty Sexy Money."

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Billy Baldwin describes his "crazy" childhood and his role on "Dirty Sexy Money." He also expresses some keen commentary on the Bush administration, the Iraq war, and his hopes for the Obama administration.

Introduction:
William Baldwin, or Billy, as he's widely known, nails the complexities of an up-and-coming, yet flawed politician on the hit ABC drama, "Dirty Sexy Money." His Attorney General and aspiring senator Patrick Darling projects charisma and and pithy sound bites to the public, while hiding a private life of turmoil and profound insecurity...
Read the full article here
 
 


Frally Hynes, Venice Magazine
Frally
Venice Magazine, November-December 2010

Frally
Turning Into The Light

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Channeling the quiet of the Australian countryside, the dynamic licks of Nashville, the weary, forthright grit of Brooklyn, and the searing sunshine of Los Angeles, Frally offers The Light, a softly wistful album of heartbreak and rebirth. By turning sadness into melodies that revived her own spirit, the singer-songwriter has created a work that explores the potential for emotional pain to bring about unforeseen leaps in personal understanding. Frally's debut release has the feel of a veteran's latest, making it hard to believe that she only learned guitar six years ago and before this album never really considered herself a singer. Flanked by Teddy Thompson, Ben Lee, and Jolie Holland as advisors and accompanying vocalists, the skilled, insightful performer has arrived fully formed and poised to make waves....
Read the full article here
 


Paramore | Venice | Andrew Fish
Paul Iacono
Venice Magazine, Summer 2010

Paul Iacono's "Hard Times"
Truth, Heart, and the Love Below

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
He belted Sinatra tunes at age three, performed at Carnegie Hall at ten, and now he's living large on MTV's "The Hard Times of RJ Berger."

Introduction:
Paul Iacono is en route to an excellent kind of infamy. With MTV's headlong leap into scripted television, the 21-year-old thespian has found himself playing the title role on "The Hard Times of RJ Berger," officially the raunchiest high-school sitcom on the air. "It's a story of the underdog," Iacono offers. "A story of this little loser kid in high school who otherwise would have gone unnoticed, but nature has given him this gift and he's going to use it. He's mad as hell and he's not gonna take it anymore." The gift Iacono is referring to is RJ's healthy endowment, which when inadvertently and fatefully exposed to the entire school during a basketball game, leads the dumbfounded coach (Marlon Young) to declare, "He's a goddamn Buick Regal!"...
Read the full article here
 


Anthony Green | Venice Magazine | Andrew Fish
Felix Van Groeningen
Venice Magazine
December 2009 / January 2010

Pain, Sorrow, and Drunken Lunacy
Felix Van Groeningen's The Misfortunates


By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Juxtaposing raunchy comedy and and painful childhood trauma, Belgian director Felix Van Groeningen delights and shatters in equal measure.

Introduction:
Being raised by four drunken louts has its ups and downs, and Felix van Groeningen’s The Misfortunates explores them both with equal precision. The Belgian production is concurrently one of the funniest portrayals of rambunctious, profanity-strewn mayhem in years, and an adeptly solemn commentary on the long-term effects of a chaotic childhood. Thirteen-year-old Gunther Strobbe’s trajectory was set from the moment of his conception, during a booze-driven sexual encounter in an alleyway...
Read the full article here
 
 


Tahar Rahim | Prophet | Andrew Fish
Tahar Rahim
Venice Magazine, February 2010

Tahar Rahim
A Star for a New Generation

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Overnight international film star, French actor Tahar Rahim, discusses his breakout role in A Prophete (Un Prophete), that blurs the ethnic divide amid Europe's new multicultural society.

Introduction:
Tahar Rahim’s first major starring role has launched him into the stratosphere. A Prophet (Un Prophète) follows the rise of Rahim’s Malik El Djebena, a young French hooligan of Arab descent, who within days of his entry into a Paris prison, is forced to murder another inmate who poses a threat to the Corsican mob. This brutal imperative serves as the springboard for Malik’s own rise to power in the criminal underworld. Embraced across Europe as a masterpiece, the Jacques Audiard-helmed epic is a 2010 Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Language Film...
Read the full article here
 



Paul J. Adams III
Venice Magazine, October 2009

Educator Paul J. Adams III on preparing inner-city youth for the Ivy Leagues

By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Paul J. Adams III is president of Providence St. Mel, a prep school in an inner-city neighborhood on the West Side of Chicago, which sends 100% of its graduates off to college.

Introduction:
On Central Boulevard across from Garfield Park, in a rough neighborhood on Chicago’s West Side, is a top-notch prep school. Amid an inner city riddled with violence and gangland rule, Providence St. Mel is a sealed-tight safety zone that boasts 29 consecutive years of sending 100% of its graduates off to four-year colleges, and over the last seven years, half of them have gone to first-tier and Ivy- League schools. The inception, survival, and growth of PSM as a college-preparatory institution is due primarily to the iron will of its founder, former principal, and current president, Paul J. Adams III.
Read the full article here

 


Malcolm Goodwin | Venice Magazine
Malcolm Goodwin
Venice Magazine, April 2008

A New face Among the Stars

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Malcolm Goodwin discusses his role in the vintage football piece, Leather-heads, and his rise from humble beginnings -- including his triumph over a crippling speech impediment.

Introduction:
Covered in mud in the George Clooney-helmed Leather-heads, and beaten senseless with a piano in American Gangster, newcomer malcolm Goodwin is taking his punches from all the right people. Three years back, with a scant five months of L.A. living under his belt, the classically handsome neophyte had already booked a role alongside two of Hollywoods most respected leads...
Read the full article here
 
 


Anthony Green | Venice Magazine | Andrew Fish
Anthony Green
Venice Magazine
December 2008 / January 2009

Gleeful Darkness
Anthony Green's Avalon explores life's futility with a fiendish smirk


By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Anthony Green of hard-rocking Circa Survive -- and formerly of Saosin -- on darkness, joy, and the meaning of his music.

Introduction:
Imagine a beam of hardcore punk-rock anguish fired into a prism, refracting and emerging as an alluring rainbow of harmonious discontent. That's Anthony Green's Avalon, the singer-songwriter's solo debut. Soaring, soothing melodies belie harsh and sometimes unsettling lyrics, exploring life's fearful, futile gallop toward emptiness -- all delivered with a fiendish smirk...
Read the full article here
 


Robert Francis | Venice Magazine | Andrew Fish
Kacey Cubero
Venice Magazine, April 2010

Kacey Cubero
The Indie Artist Serves Her Gift


By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
True indie artist Kacey Cubero wields a stellar voice and lyrics to match, and she's just getting started.

Introduction:
Soulful, soft, plaintive, rebellious, rough around the edges, and just plain rockin’, Kacey Cubero’s new album, Fill Your Cup, smoothly nestles the singer-songwriter into the fabric of Americana. She’s toured tirelessly in the U.S. and abroad, including a stint in Japan to support the troops. A self-made powerhouse, Cubero first took the stage as a child, in a rather unconventional environment. “Actually, I would sing in bars,” she recalls. “Kids could go in bars back then. My father was kind of a hustler, and he took me. If I knew the song, I would get up and sing whatever the band was playing...
Read the full article here
 



Warwick Thornton
Venice Magazine, September-October 2010

Love Blooms in Scarcity and Silence
Warwick Thornton's Samson & Delilah

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
A quiet love blooms in an arid desert amid poverty and neglect. In a small community on a Central Australian reservation, An incorrigible teenage boy sets his eye on a girl from a neighboring shack. The young woman lives with her grandmother, an elderly artist, with whom she makes Aboriginal paintings to earn a meager living. Samson attempts to woo Delilah by throwing a rock at her and tagging along on her errands. Undeterred by the cold shoulder, he tosses his mattress over her fence, cooks her a kangaroo for dinner, and still he's rebuffed....
Read the full article here
 
 



Nash Edgerton
Venice Magazine, April 2010

The Stuntman Takes the Helm
Nash Edgerton Directs The Square

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Australian stuntman Nash Edgerton directs his first full-length feature, The Square.

Introduction:
When stuntman/director Nash Edgerton set out to make his first feature film, there was some expectation that he’d embark on an actionpacked cornucopia of fight scenes, car chases, and explosions. Instead, however, the Australian filmmaker constructed The Square, a tale of passion, murder, and the aftermath of bad decisions, wherein the excitement lies not in an inundation of sights and sounds, but in a slowly building sense of desperation and doom...
Read the full article here

 



Esotouric
Venice Magazine, March-April 2011

All Aboard the Esotouric Bus
LA Through a Lens of Hard-boiled Literature and Main Street Vice

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
There were bars and B girls and nickelodeons with dirty movies. There were freak shows with sideshow geeks biting the heads off chickens and crying for liquor late into the night. You could pay a dime for a twirl at a taxi dance hall or stop by the Burbank for a night of burlesque. Dozens of nationalities filled the streets and hotels, and the heady air of debauchery permeated everything. There were the notorious fires at the St. George Hotel, the suicides at the El Dorado, the serial killers who lived at the Cecil, and the grand opulence of the Alexandria. Main Street, downtown Los Angeles, 1940s.
Read the full article here

 


Lily Cole | Venice Magazine | Andrew Fish
Lily Cole
Venice Magazine
December 2009 / January 2010

Lily Cole
Far Beyond Expectation


By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
From top-tier model to co-starring in the latest Terry Gilliam epic, The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus, Lily Cole is full of surprises.

Introduction:
London beauty Lily Cole was discovered by a talent scout in Soho one day, and began her journey toward blasting expectations on a world stage. Modeling in Vogue and lending her China-doll face and striking red hair to Chanel, Versace, and Louis Vuitton, she was embraced for her extraordinary charm and allure. And when she was accepted to King’s College, Cambridge, she stunned quite a few. Now, as the buzz intensi fies around Cole’s co-starring role in Terry Gilliam’s latest dreamlike epic, The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus...
Read the full article here
 
 



Tiffany Shlain
Venice Magazine, September-October 2011

Connected
Tiffany Shlain's ode to the age of interdependence

By Andrew Fish

Introduction:
Our bodies haven't evolved much over the past 150,000 years, yet we've recently developed the ability to transmit our thoughts instantly across thousands of miles with a couple of hand motions. If we have a question we have split-second access to all of human knowledge, and if we're lonely we can reach out to a network of billions of minds. Technology is our evolution and the Internet is one of its quantum leaps. Filmmaker Tiffany Shlain has been marveling at this weaving together of humanity since the Internet's dawn in the mid-'90s, and her new film, Connected, is an ode to the age of interdependence. Shlain originally planned the documentary as a collaboration with her father, Dr. Leonard Shlain, a noted surgeon and author of books on the human mind. Yet when he was diagnosed with brain cancer, Shlain discovered a new perspective. The resulting work is an exploration of the vastness of our minds' reach and the importance of cherishing those closest to us...
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All Time Low
Venice Magazine, October 2009

The Pop-Punk Wunderkinds Get Personal

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
All Time Low, pop punks who started rocking in Maryland in 9th grade, tear it up while staying in touch with their fans and their roots.

Introduction:
Red-eyed and poised to rock, the boys of All Time Low connect with us from Germany, where they’re gearing up to play the Backstage Club in Munich. On the heels of a two-day stint in Sweden, this is the pop punks’ third show on the Deutschland leg of their European tour, which climaxes in Berlin the following night -- and then they’re off to Amsterdam and the U.K. “We’re all on weird time schedules,” laughs frontman Alex Gaskarth. “None of us wakes up before three in the afternoon, and we don’t go to bed before six in the morning. The jetlag is definitely crushing us right now.”...
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Mark Hartley
Venice Magazine, October 2009

Sex, Guns, and Monster Trucks
Mark Hartley's Not Quite Hollywood

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Mark Hartley's Not Quite Hollywood careens through the lawless era of Australian "Ozploitation" flicks.

Introduction:
“Take Mad Max as an example,” recounts director Mark Hartley. “On the first day of the shoot, Grant Page, the stunt coordinator, has got the lead actress on the back of his motorcycle on the way to the set. What they were doing the night before, I’ll leave up to your imagination. He’s driving down the road early in the morning, and a semi-trailer is coming towards them. The sun is blaring in the truck driver’s eyes and he doesn’t see them. So Grant has to swerve the bike on its side, and actually go underneath, between the wheels of the semi-trailer to save his life — and before he does that, he looks back and sees that his lead actress has got her head poked up. He elbows her in the face to get her to stick her head down, breaks her nose, they actually slide under the truck to safety, and then the bike comes to a halt and collapses on them and breaks Grant’s leg..."
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Lea Salonga | Venice Magazine
Lea Salonga
Venice Magazine
July  / August 2008

Lea Salonga
Seasoning Sorrow with Sweetness

By Andrew Fish

Synopsis:
Lea Salonga is best known as the original lead in Broadway's "Miss Saigon," and as the singing voice of Princess Jasmine in Disney's Aladdin. She discusses her dual role as a Broadway star and new mother.

Introduction:
Born with a voice that is lighter than air, Lea Salonga's formidable vocal talent has made an indelible mark on musical theater internationally. The Tony Award-winning actress has focused her lilting gift on expressing the heaviest of emotions -- with a dose of Disney added to the mix...
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Robert Francis | Venice Magazine | Andrew Fish
Robert Francis
Venice Magazine
December 2009 / January 2010

Robert Francis
Arising From Emptiness


By Andrew Fish


Synopsis:
Bringing quiet, heartfelt echos of loss center stage, musician-singer-songwriter Robert Francis offers solice and renewal with his latest LP, Before Nightfall.

Introduction:
A serene hush sweeping over an entire crowd at the Roxy is an uncommon thing, yet as Robert Francis played his final song at the venerable Sunset club, there wasn’t a murmur or clink of a beer bottle. Francis has breathed new life into the rustic heart of folk, and mesmerized the room — a reminder that quiet simplicity can still hold sway. At 22, Francis has already shown an impressive range, with a pronounced shift in sound from his first album to his latest. His self-produced One by One (2007, Aeronaut Records), which took a year to complete, flows with intertwining instrumentals...
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